SSP Current Issue

January, 2018 – Volume 11, Issue 1

Building Operator Certification (BOC) training begins in March

KSMI: ‘Life Cycle Perspective’ and moving forward in sustainable manufacturing

UK CAER receives DOE grant to modularize gasification technology, create new economic opportunities



Newsbits

– Kentucky Association of Manufacturers – Your participation is requested

– Building Operator Certification (BOC) call for instructors

– Business model innovation: Making the leap in sustainable value creation

– UofL Sport Administration team headed to the Super Bowl as Green Ambassadors

– How brownfields recovery are transforming the bluegrass state

– Companies are riding the renewable energy wave but are skipping other energy-saving measures

– GreenBiz: 7 ways to build a sustainable work culture



Upcoming Training, Events and Conferences

– EPA National Stormwater Calculator Update

– ESRC Webinar: Practical Approaches to Source Reduction

– KSMI Module 3 Webinar and Workshop

– Global Waste Management Symposium

– Plastics Recycling 2018 Conference

– ENERGY STAR webinars

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Building Operator Certification (BOC) training begins in March

The Building Operator Certification training program is ramping up in Kentucky with the first round of Level I classes beginning on March 28, 2018 at the University of Louisville Shelby Campus, and another planned for later in the year.

Building Operator Certification (BOC) is a nationally recognized, competency-based program focusing on energy-efficient building operations and preventive maintenance procedures. The program will train facility personnel to understand how their building systems work together, and how to bring them to their most efficient level of operation.

The Kentucky Pollution Prevention Center (KPPC) and the Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (MEEA) have collaborated to bring the Building Operator Certification (BOC) program to the Commonwealth of Kentucky through funding provided by the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet.

The education and technical assistance provided through this collaboration will contribute to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and support conservation of energy in existing buildings and facilities through implementation of energy efficiency measures.

KPPC will provide coaching assistance to training participants for course assignments and facility-level operations to enhance effectiveness and increase implementation rates.

Building Operator Certification (BOC) training includes nearly 74 hours of classroom and project work (7.4 CEUs) in building systems operation and maintenance. Each class in the series is completed in one day, except BOC 1001 – Energy Efficient Operation of Building HVAC Systems, which is a two day class. To complete the series, participants must pass a test at the end of each training day and complete five assigned projects. Tuition must be paid prior to the first day of class.

Find out more about the Building Operator Certification Training and how to register for Level 1 curriculum beginning March 28th.

 

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KSMI: ‘Life Cycle Perspective’ and moving forward in sustainable manufacturing

The Kentucky Sustainable Manufacturing Initiative (KSMI) training series recently completed the second webinar in a series on the Life Cycle Perspective. This webinar was presented on January 11, 2018 by Mark Toda, a Senior Sustainability Engineer with the Kentucky Pollution Prevention Center (KPPC) and facilitated by Lissa McCracken, KPPC Executive Director. A recording of the webinar has been published to the KPPC website and is now available for viewing.

This webinar provided an overview and framework for thinking about the product life cycle (LCP) and evaluating environmental and business aspects throughout the cycle. Topics introduced during the webinar addressed cradle to cradle considerations that drive life cycle thinking. Evaluating the product life cycle, using tools such as a sustainable value stream map (Sus-VSM) and applying the 6R Concept that can improve performance and lead to sustainable product development, were key elements of this webinar.

The objective of this webinar was to provide a framework for thinking about life cycle perspective as it relates to manufacturing, learning some basic principles of life cycle thinking, to facilitate incorporating life cycle perspective within an organization and to extend considerations to the entire product life cycle.

View the recorded Life Cycle Perspective webinar.

The next webinar in the series will focus on developing a culture for innovation to achieve sustainability in manufacturing. This free one hour webinar is scheduled for Thursday, February 8, 2018 at 11 a.m. and will provide an overview of key cultural ingredients within organizations to facilitate and enhance sustainability success.

KSMI Workshop to be held at Ford Louisville Assembly Plant – February 22, 2018

The last in the KSMI series of workshops will take place at the Ford Louisville Assembly Plant on Fern Valley Road and will focus on moving forward with sustainable manufacturing. The workshop will be held on Thursday, February 22, 2018 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

This workshop will focus on developing a positive culture for sustainability and moving forward successfully by incorporating sustainable manufacturing principles. Participants will learn from other Kentucky manufacturers, engage in a discussion of incorporating life cycle perspective into the new ISO 14001:2015 standard, understand how Kentucky’s TRI database can benefit manufacturers, and learn about the core engineering research facilities at the University of Louisville. An introduction to sustainable product development will be presented in preparation for a future instructional webinar.

Cost to attend is $35 per person (credit card only) and includes continental breakfast, lunch and afternoon snacks at the facility. Professional development hours (PDH) will be available for all workshop attendees.

Find out more about the KSMI Module 3 training events and how to register for the next webinar and workshop in February 2018.

 

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UK CAER receives DOE grant to modularize gasification technology, create new economic opportunities

By Dave Melanson Jan. 16, 2018

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 16, 2018) — The University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) has received a $1.6 million U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant that will seek to modularize and standardize gasification systems that could be used across the Commonwealth of Kentucky to turn existing coal resources into new energy feedstocks.

The project — titled Staged Opposed Multi-Burner for Modular Gasifier — was funded by DOE’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and will develop and test a scaled-down version of an opposed, multi-burner (OMB) gasifier to standardize the gasification process in a manner that could significantly reduce the cost of the technology. Gasification is typically completed on a large scale. The CAER project will take that traditional gasification technology and tweak it for efficient operation in a modular system. If the engineering portion of this project is successful, the new design can be brought directly to communities across the state where the feedstock remains.

Gasification is the process of converting materials into carbon monoxide, hydrogen and carbon dioxide by reacting the materials at very high temperatures with limited oxygen. The process creates synthetic gas (syngas), which can be used as fuel or converted to liquid fuels and chemicals.

“We are seeking to create a gasification system that can be taken into any Kentucky community that has leftover coal materials and give those materials a new life as an energy source,” said Rodney Andrews, director of CAER and principal investigator on this project. “There is an abundance of coal slurry and other coal-based resources across the Commonwealth. Most of these materials are not being utilized currently and are sometimes considered an environmental hazard. If successful, this project would allow us to give those materials a new life in Kentucky’s energy mix.”

The proposed staged-OMB arrangement will provide a high fuel and loading flexibility by varying load among burners, as well as improve fuel conversion and gasification efficiency through provision of better flow fields. This arrangement also enhances mixing due to staged-firing with additional burners, and prolongs burner service life by controlling temperature distribution along the gasifier, thereby avoiding hot spots.

In addition, the project seeks to standardize the burner design. Burner service life is a problem for gasification systems, as repairing burners on current systems is often costly. The CAER project seeks to modularize burner design and installation so that all of the burners are identical and can be easily replaced when needed.

This is the second grant CAER has received from NETL in recent months to study gasification-related technology. The center recently received funding to support a front end engineering design study for a 5-megawatt electric equivalent polygenerating unit utilizing waste coal fines and biomass as feedstocks, working with partners in Hazard, Kentucky. Both awards are part of NETL’s efforts to foster early adoption of small-scale modular coal-gasification. As NETL notes, “these technologies may open new market opportunities for domestic coal.”

Kunlei Liu, associate director for research at CAER, is working on both NETL-funded projects. He said that the two projects will allow CAER and community and industry partners to find solutions that will “better realize the full potential of Kentucky’s abundant coal and its residuals.”

“These projects represent both an energy opportunity and a chance to recycle and re-purpose materials that were not always considered high-value,” Liu said. “As a center that is constantly seeking to find solutions to real problems across the Commonwealth of Kentucky, we feel that modular gasification has a chance to create jobs, spur economic growth and improve Kentucky’s environment.”

View the original article on the UK Now, University of Kentucky News website.

 

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Newsbits

Kentucky Association of Manufacturers – Your participation is requested

The Kentucky Association of Manufacturers (KAM) is soliciting participation in helping KAM improve its service to members!

The Kentucky Association of Manufacturers is moving forward under new leadership. Executive Director Lee Lingo and the KAM Board of Directors are very interested in opinions on how to better serve KAM members. The Association is asking for input via a brief survey to determine next steps and long-term planning.

Everyone who completes the survey will be entered into a random drawing for a pair of Apple Air Pods as KAM’s way of thanking you for your participation. The survey will end by close of business February 14, 2018.

Take the survey today!

About KAM
Established in 1911, KAM is Kentucky’s most effective advocate for manufacturers. KAM’s mission is to create and protect a manufacturing-friendly environment in Kentucky. In addition to advocating, KAM educates, connects and provides cost-saving programs and products to members. For more information, visit www.KAM.us.com.

 

Building Operator Certification (BOC) call for instructors

KPPC and the Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (MEEA) have collaborated to bring the Building Operator Certification (BOC) program to the Commonwealth of Kentucky through funding provided by the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet.

Building Operator Certification (BOC) is energy efficiency training for operators of commercial buildings, offering improved job skills and more comfortable, efficient facilities. Instructors are needed to teach full day classes in their areas of expertise, using the BOC materials and curriculum provided to cover a wide range of topics.

Find out more about the Building Operator Certification program coming to Kentucky in 2018 and how to become a BOC instructor [PDF].

 

Business model innovation: Making the leap in sustainable value creation

The Carbon Trust’s Aleyn Smith-Gillespie underscores why new business models are the key to a green economy revolution

To meet the environmental and social challenges the world currently faces, innovation needs to go beyond just products and technologies: we need new business models.

New business models create breakthroughs in the scale and speed at which we can transition to a sustainable economy. By creating, delivering and capturing value in new and better ways, they can rapidly transform whole value chains for the better, changing the behavior and attitudes of competitors, suppliers, partners and customers.

We are already seeing a lot of progress in remanufacturing and other models that extend the lifetime of products. Caterpillar’s ‘Cat Reman’ brand is an established example of product remanufacturing at end-of-life, thereby preserving and reusing value. Canon are applying remanufacturing and re-conditioning models for printers and copiers; and Philips are refurbishing medical equipment at end-of-life for resale to new customers. Group SEB, a French household appliances company, are the first manufacturer in their segment committing to repairability of their products for a 10 year period.

Remanufacturing can save up to 80 per cent of ‘embedded’ carbon emissions compared to making new products by not requiring significant additional material inputs. Cost structures for remanufacturing and re-conditioning of products can also provide the flexibility to price lower, making products more affordable and expanding markets.

There are also very exciting new service-based models emerging. These occur where companies re-think who their target customer really is, and what value propositions would most effectively meet their requirements. By shifting from selling products to services, companies are able to incentivise resource efficiency, cut waste, and de-couple value creation from resource use.

As an example, Hilti shifted from selling tools to construction workers to providing a service to construction company managers for access to tools-on-demand, with guaranteed performance and quality. Similarly, Mud Jeans leases clothing for a monthly fee, providing customers with the option to either keep their jeans or switch to a new product at the end of the lease period.

For many industries collaboration is an important element in unlocking new, more sustainable and more competitive business models. Inditex, parent company of retailers including Zara and Massimo Dutti, is partnering with suppliers to create reusable fibers and establishing product take-back channels downstream. BAM Construction is partnering with IBM and construction product suppliers to enable materials within buildings to be tracked and re-used at end of life.

Because creating new value goes beyond the financial, benefiting society and the environment, this can make a significant difference to a company’s license to operate. Demonstrating social benefit can reinforce the foundations for future success. Conversely, if you are a laggard in this respect, it can hamper growth and competitiveness. Importantly, companies need to have a clear perspective on how new business models create value for customers – this is a basic requirement to ensure viability.

A systematic approach to business model innovation

The core concept of the circular economy provides useful framework for designing radical resource efficiency into systems. But in order for this to be successful, it requires simultaneous changes to existing business models.

Read the full article to learn more about business model patterns for the circular economy on the Business Green website.

 

UofL Sport Administration team headed to the Super Bowl

Students will serve as “Green Ambassadors” to learn more about recycling and green initiatives with sport

A dozen UofL Sport Administration (SPAD) students and three professors are headed north for the Feb. 4 match up between the Philadelphia Eagles and the New England Patriots at U.S. Bank Stadium in Minneapolis. Most of them will be working as NFL/PepsiCo Zero Waste Super Bowl green ambassadors.

“I am super pumped,” said Bruce Dougherty, who will graduate in May with his master’s degree in SPAD. “When Dr. (Megan) Shreffler emailed us about possibly going to the Super Bowl, I had to read the email like three times because I didn’t think it was real.”

Shreffler, an assistant professor in the department of health and sport sciences, said she wanted to see if there was any chance her students could be a part of the Super Bowl and in December contacted a colleague at the University of Minnesota, where Shreffler received her PhD in kinesiology in 2013. There were opportunities available, but she was just days from the application deadline for the PepsiCo gig.

Shreffler spent the next few days frantically emailing students, compiling applications and figuring out transportation and housing. “The whole week was a whirlwind,” she said.

In the end, she pulled together a group of three professors (including herself), eight master’s degree students, three undergraduate students and a doctoral student for the Super Bowl trip, a first for the SPAD program.

“Within the SPAD program, we really try to show students what class concepts look like in real-life settings,” Shreffler said, and the Super Bowl is about as real-life as you get for major sporting events.

The Super Bowl trip will give students a view from the “event manager perspective, everything that goes into an event and working a game day, but will also provide a glimpse into corporate social responsibility as students will serve as green ambassadors,” she said.

PepsiCo will have the team working a 12-hour shift encouraging fans to separate trash from items that can be recycled or composted. Team members will also act as “goodwill ambassadors” for fans throughout the day by helping them take selfies, guiding them around the stadium or helping them seek medical or security assistance. They will also get paid an hourly wage.

“We will get to learn more about recycling and green initiatives with sport,” Dougherty said. “I think that’s really important. In the future, green initiatives in facilities and operations are going to be really big.”

According to a news release, partners the NFL, PepsiCo, Aramark, U.S. Bank Stadium and the Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority have a goal to recover more than 90 percent of stadium waste at Super Bowl LII. That’s more than 40 tons of waste, and it includes recycling bottles and cans, composting food waste and service ware and repurposing items like discarded handbags, signage and construction materials through local community organizations.

Shreffler said she hopes to be able to take SPAD students to more major sporting events in the future.

Read the original article by Janet Cappiello on the UofL News website.

 

How brownfields recovery are transforming the bluegrass state

The once-bustling G.E. incandescent light bulb factory at 200 West Loudon Ave. in Lexington had shut down in 2010 becoming an eyesore, and a financial drain on the city.

With no suitable tenant, the building was demolished and the 14-acre site was closed off due to ground contamination.

It had become what is known as a brownfield, a property that is abandoned or underutilized due to real environmental contamination or the perception of environmental contamination.

The property sat vacant until June, 2013, when Lextran, the city’s bus system, with risk-management assistance through the Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection’s (DEP) Brownfield Redevelopment and Reuse program, agreed to buy the former G.E. site for $1.7 million.

Over the next three years, what was once a contaminated piece of Lexington’s downtown acreage was transformed. Ensconced in a new building, Lextran, with a $20-million budget, now provides jobs, taxes and puts the bus system closer to its Lexington riders.

The Loudon Avenue facility, is part of a success story similar to many other brownfield projects being done across the state that help communities take eyesores and turn them into productive use.

“It was a win in that Lextran finds its main operating facilities closer to its clients,” said Tony Hatton, Deputy Commissioner of the Department for Environmental Protection. “We no longer have a piece of property sitting there fallow that those who live around it have to look at, and that property has been returned to the tax roles where it can generate economic benefit.

There are an estimated 8,000 brownfields across the state. They include sites such as old gas stations, abandoned schools and hospitals and former dry cleaning facilities. In many cases, economic change has left behind properties that not only cause blight, but may pose environmental and safety issues for a community. They also can invite crime, decrease property values and promote disinvestment in areas.

The brownfield program is having the opposite effect, working successfully since 1997 to create opportunities for businesses and non-profits, cleaning up perceived and real environmental contamination and returning environmentally questionable or unused pieces of property back to the tax rolls and back to the community.

Read more about how the brownfield redevelopment program has helped business and the public sector on the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet’s Webzine.

 

Companies are riding the renewable energy wave but are skipping other energy-saving measures

By Ken Silverstein for Forbes

Even if President Donald Trump withdraws U.S. support for the Paris climate change accord, domestic efforts to battle global warming will continue. Dozens of states and many cities have policies intended to reduce emissions of greenhouses gases and deal with the effects of rising temperatures. Even in red states, many consider flood prevention and renewable energy are considered smart business.

Sun Chemical is now deploying onsite and offsite renewable energy programs as a way to cut electricity costs and to improve environmental performance. Its latest effort is the installation of rooftop and carport solar panels, all under a contract to buy the output at a fixed cost to serve one of its production facilities in New Jersey — a deal that it says has saved it $400,000.

Businesses, generally, are getting primed to do business in the New Energy Economy, meaning they are focused on reducing heat trapping emissions and relying increasingly on sustainable fuels to power facilities. That awareness, in fact, is growing exponentially, all brought on by the falling cost of technologies that are enabling the evolution. Companies, nevertheless, may be oblivious to other energy-saving strategies that would add even more value.

“Over the last two to four years, renewable technologies have become more cost effective in many countries and markets around the world,” Bill Brewer, vice president of Energy and Sustainability Services at Schneider Electric, told this writer. “Companies are now evaluating these opportunities.

“But they could be doing a lot more,” he said, referencing new research report that looks at how organizations are preparing to participate in the clean energy economy. “There is a lack of coordination and strategic planning and an inability to share budgets to get greater buying power. There is also insufficient knowledge that these programs are out there, and it all takes expertise and time.”

Schneider Electric joined with GreenBiz to survey nearly 240 companies with revenues of $100 million or more a year. Roughly 85% of respondents said they are taking action over the next three years to reduce their carbon footprints. Outside of renewables, however, only small percentage are implementing more advanced strategies and technologies to manage energy and emissions: localized microgrids, energy storage devices, programs to shift energy usage during peak periods, or cloud-based data-sharing tools — to name a few.

While its research says that 51% of those it surveyed will implement renewable energy programs, other analyses show that number to be as high 72%: PriceWaterhouseCoopers said that businesses are doing so to cut costs and to meet their environmental goals, or reduce CO2 levels.

“The movement toward renewables is likely due to C-level interest and support,” says the Schneider-GreenBiz report titled The State of Corporate Energy and Sustainability Programs 2018. “Whether their role involves recommending, reviewing or approving projects, 82% reported being involved at some level in sustainability and renewable energy initiatives.”

Read the full article on the Forbes website and find out about the focus of Yum Brands to connect with its environmentally-conscious customers through green initiatves.

 

See What’s New at ESRC

The Environmental Sustainability Resource Center (ESRC) is a member of the Pollution Prevention ESRC-Logo120x120Resource Exchange (P2Rx™), a national network of regional information centers. The objective of the ESRC is to provide technical environmental sustainability information and training to industrial service providers in EPA Regions 3 & 4. Region 3 includes Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, D.C., Delaware and Maryland. Region 4 includes Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee. ESRC resources and staff are available to users in industry, consulting and universities. Please visit the ESRC website or call toll free (855) 531-3772 for more information.


Enhancing Business Operations through Sustainability – ESRC Training Series

The Environmental Sustainability Resource Center (ESRC) is providing a training series of webinars intended to enhance business operations through applied sustainability strategies.

This four-part webinar series is designed to educate commercial and industrial facilities on the business case for environmental sustainability, identify building blocks for a successful program and provide examples and resources to help turn actions into outcomes.

The FREE webinars will take place at 1:00-2:00 pm Eastern on the first Tuesday of each month from February through May 2018.

Benefits of Participating in the Webinars

  • Identify low-cost/no-cost opportunities to stimulate business success through sustainability.
  • Enhance environmental performance.
  • Build an organizational culture that embraces and succeeds through sustainability.
  • Observe real-world examples of implementation.
  • Obtain tools and resources to assist sustainability efforts.
  • Learn about technical assistance available.

 

Webinar 1: Practical Approaches to Source Reduction
Tuesday, February 6, 2018 1:00-2:00 p.m. EST

Find out more about the training series and register for this webinar.

 

GreenBiz – Sustainability news and resources

GreenBiz advances the opportunities at the intersection of business, technology and sustainability. Through its websites, events, peer-to-peer network and research, GreenBiz promotes the potential to drive transformation and accelerate progress — within companies, industries and in the very nature of business. Since 1991, GreenBiz has chronicled and been a catalyst for thought leadership in aligning environmental responsibility with profitable business practices.

Currently on the GreenBiz website by Suzy Greenwood:

7 ways to build a sustainable work culture

Most people believe in the need to act sustainably to protect our environment, and most business leaders appreciate both the broader benefits and the direct positive impact of sustainable behavior on their bottom line. As individuals, we understand that small actions add up to collective impact; yet as human beings, we are surprisingly averse to change: We struggle to adapt our behaviors and to adopt new habits, even when we want to. Knowing and wanting isn’t always enough.

A breakout session of BusinessGreen’s recent 10th anniversary Leaders Summit was dedicated to employee engagement. As people around the room shared their experiences, a pattern quickly emerged: most were lone rangers or members of small tribes nobly flying the flag of sustainability, yet ultimately struggling to convince their colleagues to make substantial and meaningful changes.

Having launched our own sustainability initiative at Hill+Knowlton Strategies last year, I knew all too well the difficulty of getting a program off the ground. But thanks to a combination of innovative platform Do Nation, behavior change nudges from our SMARTER behavioral insights team, and of course excellent internal communications, our efforts really paid off. The program was rewarded not only by engagement levels that far surpassed expectations, but also the accolade of BusinessGreen’s 2017 Employee Engagement Award.

Engaging employees in sustainability has wide-reaching benefits, far beyond our individual companies. So rather than sit back and feel pleased with our efforts, I wanted to share our learning in the hope that it might help others start similar programs:

1. Make it fun

2. Keep it simple

3. Start small

4. Show momentum

5. Make the effects real

6. Show people they’re part of a crowd

7. Remind people of their values

Too often, employee engagement campaigns focus on telling people what to do, comforted by a position of moral high ground but resulting in a limited effect. Instead, consider human behavior first and find ways of encouraging sustainable actions that are easy to do, fun and have a better impact on people’s individual lives. In doing so, you’ll have much greater success and be able to embed sustainability into your corporate culture for the long-term.

Read more about each of these seven ways to build a sustainable work culture in the full article on the GreenBiz website.

Find the latest articles, videos and resources on the GreenBiz website.

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Upcoming Training, Events and Conferences

  • EPA National Stormwater Calculator Update
    EPA’s Safe and Sustainable Water Resources research program provides the science and innovative technologies that the Agency and the nation need to maintain drinking water resources and systems, as well as to protect the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the nation’s waters. It uses an integrated, systems approach to support the availability of the clean, adequate, and equitable water supplies necessary for human well-being and resilient aquatic ecosystems.
    January 31 at 2 p.m. EST
    Register for this webinar.
  • ESRC Webinar – Practical Approaches to Source Reduction
    The Environmental Sustainability Resource Center (ESRC) is providing a training series of webinars intended to enhance business operations through applied sustainability strategies. This four-part webinar series is designed to educate commercial and industrial facilities on the business case for environmental sustainability, identify building blocks for a successful program and provide examples and resources to help turn actions into outcomes.
    February 6 at 1 p.m. EST
    Register for this informative webinar.
  • KSMI Webinar 3 – Culture for Innovation to Achieve Sustainability
    This free webinar will provide an overview of key cultural ingredients within organizations to facilitate and enhance sustainability performance.
    February 8 at 11 a.m. EST
    Register for this sustainable manufacturing webinar.
  • Global Waste Management Symposium
    North America’s #1 technical conference for the presentation of applied and fundamental research and case studies on waste management. This year’s GWMS program will be more comprehensive than ever, delivering the critical content and research that you need to know—and that warrants the two-year wait. Industry experts will be covering the topics you that you asked to learn more about.
    February 11-20 – Indian Wells, CA
    Find out more about this symposium and how to register.
  • Plastics Recycling 2018 Conference
    Plastics Recycling 2018 is the focal point for the increasingly complex and international plastics recycling industry. The event, now in its 13th year, brings together plastics reclaimers, equipment manufacturers, brand owners, brokers, government officials and leading sustainability voices from around the globe to deepen connections and push the sector forward.
    February 19-21 – Gaylord Opryland, Nashville, TN
    Find out more about this conference.
  • The Road to Alternative Energy
    Energy efficiency first, then add alternative energy projects to reduce the cost of energy and a company’s environmental impact. PennTAP will review methods to maximize energy efficiency, in order to minimize alternative energy equipment and installation costs.
    February 20 at 12 p.m. EST
    Register for this free webinar.
  • KSMI Module 3 Workshop – Sustainable Manufacturing, Moving Forward
    This workshop will focus on developing a positive culture for sustainability and moving forward successfully by incorporating sustainable manufacturing principles. Participants will learn from other Kentucky manufacturers, engage in a discussion of incorporating life cycle perspective into the new ISO 14001:2015 standard, understand how Kentucky’s TRI database can benefit manufacturers, and learn about the core engineering research facilities at the University of Louisville.
    February 22 from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. EST – Ford Louisville Assembly Plant, Louisville, KY
    Register for this sustainable manufacturing workshop.

 

EPA ENERGY STAR webinars:

  • Updated 1-100 ENERGY STAR Score for Worship Centers
    The underlying ENERGY STAR model for Worship Facilities will be updated next year with 2012 CBECS data. Join us to learn what variables will be included in the new model, the methodology EPA uses to create a score, and guidance on how to prepare for the change.
    January 30 at 12 p.m. EST
  • What You Should Know about Financing Energy Efficiency Upgrades
    Learn how public sector organizations are improving energy efficiency with innovative solutions to financial barriers. Attendees will learn about financing projects in the public and private sectors, the basics of performance contracting, and how EPA’s tools and resources can help you make the decision to improve your facilities now or later.
    February 13 at 2 p.m. EST
  • How to Track Waste & Materials in Portfolio Manager
    In addition to benchmarking energy and water use in Portfolio Manager, you can measure and track waste & materials generated by your building. Upgrade from the cumbersome spreadsheet you have been using, or get started for the first time, and learn how to use the waste tracking feature.
    February 21 at 1 p.m. EST

 

View these plus more ENERGY STAR training opportunities and to register.

View recorded ENERGY STAR webinars at any time.

 

Ca.jpg-icon-SSPTo view these and other sustainability-related events, please visit the KPPC Events Calendar.

 

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