SSP June 2018

June, 2018 – Volume 11, Issue 6

Building Operator Certification training in Lexington begins August 2018

Waste Management unveils $30M sustainability infrastructure at Outer Loop facility

Former Lexington councilman named director of PACE financing for Energize Kentucky



Newsbits

Learn more about the National Pollution Prevention Roundtable (NPPR)

Solar Alliance and Whayne Supply collaborate on three solar projects in Kentucky

MIT experts pioneer a way to recover drinking water from power plants

Improve sustainable manufacturing with ASTM standards

ESRC: Enhancing business operations through sustainability

GreenBiz: Message from Mars: How to institutionalize sustainability



Upcoming Training, Events and Conferences

EPA Energy Star Portfolio Manager Training Series @ Spalding University

NPPR Briefing Webinar

17th Annual Sustainability Summit

Building Operator Certification (BOC) level I training

Beat the Peak – Using Water Wisely for Commercial Outdoor Spaces

Award Winning Energy Service Companies – 2018 ENERGY STAR Partners of the Year for Service & Product Providers

ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager webinars

SSP banner image


Building Operator Certification (BOC) training in Lexington begins August 2018

Registration deadline is August 9th!

The Building Operator Certification training program second round of Level I classes has been scheduled to begin on August 16, 2018 in Lexington, Kentucky and will be hosted by the East Kentucky Power Cooperative.

Building Operator Certification (BOC) is a nationally recognized, competency-based program focusing on energy-efficient building operations and preventive maintenance procedures. The program will train facility personnel to understand how their building systems work together, and how to bring them to their most efficient level of operation.

The Kentucky Pollution Prevention Center (KPPC) and the Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (MEEA) have collaborated to bring the Building Operator Certification (BOC) program to the Commonwealth of Kentucky through funding provided by the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet.

Building Operator Certification (BOC) training includes nearly 74 hours of classroom and project work (7.4 CEUs) in building systems operation and maintenance. Each class in the series is completed in one day, except BOC 1001 – Energy Efficient Operation of Building HVAC Systems, which is a two day class. To complete the series, participants must pass a test at the end of each training day and complete five assigned projects. Tuition must be paid prior to the first day of class.

KPPC will provide coaching assistance to training participants for course assignments and facility-level operations to enhance effectiveness and increase implementation rates.

Through funding support by the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet, the tuition fee has been reduced from $1695 to $895 per person!

Find out more about the Building Operator Certification training and how to register for classes beginning August 16th.

Scroll to Top


Waste Management unveils $30M sustainability infrastructure at Outer Loop facility

Waste Management unveiled a new $30 million renewal energy infrastructure Tuesday at the Outer Loop Recycling and Disposal Facility.

Tim Wells, area vice president of Waste Management, told the crowd at the ribbon-cutting ceremony that the new technology is part of the waste disposal company’s commitment to reduce harmful emissions.

“The Outer Loop facility accepts approximately one million tons of waste a year from area businesses and homes. This project closes the loop. This new facility will produce enough pipeline-quality natural gas each day to fuel 800 of our CNG (compressed natural gas) collection vehicles across North America or power up to 14,000 homes a day,” Wells said.

Houston-based Waste Management provides collection, transfer, recycling and resource recovery, and disposal services throughout the United States. The infrastructure at the Outer Loop facility is the first of its size for the company and will serve as a template for a planned roll out of the technology nationwide.

Much of the waste that goes into landfills is organic, that includes food and cardboard. Bacteria digest this material to produce natural byproduct like the greenhouse gases methane and carbon dioxide.

Waste Management said its new technology will capture the methane through a series of interconnected wells and convert it into pipeline-quality natural gas. The process will reduce the plant’s greenhouse gas emissions, which are harmful to the environment, by more than 80 percent, the company said.

Like wind, solar and other biofuels, landfill gas is a renewable source of fuel and energy endorsed by the Environmental Protection Agency as an alternative to fossil fuels.

Secretary of the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet Charles Snavely commended Waste Management at the ceremony for showing that sustainability doesn’t have to come at the expense of profitability. The secretary said there are eight other facilities in the state that are converting methane to natural gas and 27 additional facilities capable of doing so.

“It’s a great example of what we’re doing with sustainability in Kentucky. It started in the ’90s when we began the contained solid waste landfills, and it’s continuing now as we are taking the methane from those landfills and converting it to a renewable resource. This is the largest facility in the state. It’s a great example that sustainability is good business, and we appreciate Waste Management taking this step on their own to capture this renewable resource and make use of it,” Snavely added.

The original article appeared on the Insider Louisville website which is no longer in operation as of August 7, 2020.

Scroll to Top


Former Lexington councilman named director of PACE financing for Energize Kentucky

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 4, 2018) — Former Lexington councilman George Myers has been tapped to serve as director of PACE financing for Energize Kentucky, the non-profit organization that helps commercial, office, industrial, agricultural, and multi-family building owners and developers secure financing to make energy-efficiency improvements to their buildings and projects.

In April, the council approved legislation creating a countywide Energy Project Assessment District (EPAD) that allows commercial property owners in Lexington to obtain Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing to pay for energy-efficiency improvements. In May, after an RFP process, the council selected Energize Kentucky as its EPAD Program Administrator.

Myers’ role with Energize Kentucky is to assist commercial property owners in the Lexington area to take advantage of this financial tool, which covers 100 percent of all hard and soft costs associated with energy upgrades and helps mitigate the often-costly initial investment in these new and emerging technologies.

“PACE financing can be used for all types of energy upgrades – high efficiency air conditioning and heating systems, LED lighting, roofing, geothermal systems, solar panels, elevators, and water conservation projects,” Myers said. “These improvements are accomplished through fixed-rate, long-term loans that require no down payment or personal or business guarantees. The loan is repaid annually through a voluntary special assessment on the property owner’s tax bill.”

In addition to Lexington, about a dozen local governments in Kentucky — including Jefferson and Campbell counties and the cities of Covington, Newport, Bellevue, Bowling Green, Owensboro, and Frankfort — have passed legislation creating EPADs.

Myers, who served as 8th District Council Member on Urban County Council from 2005 to 2015, is working closely with the city-county government to promote PACE financing.

“I am excited to work with the current administration and Urban County Council members, many of whom I served with for years, to ensure the success of this program,” he said.

Myers also will work with other municipal governments in Central Kentucky to establish EPADs in those jurisdictions for PACE financing.

“PACE financing is a proven driver of economic development and a job creator in the cities and counties where it is being utilized,” he said. “We want to work with commercial property owners and related industry partners to bring the same results Central Kentucky.”

“These projects make good business sense and are good for the environment,” he said. “Once property owners understand the advantages of PACE financing, they often increase their investments and install the ‘best’ energy-efficient solutions over the ‘good or better’ technologies — maximizing their internal rate of return.”

Read the full article on the Lane Report website.

Find out more about Energy Project Assessment Districts (EPAD) in Kentucky and view the Financing Energy Projects infographic.

Scroll to Top


Newsbits

 

Learn more about the National Pollution Prevention Roundtable (NPPR)

The National Pollution Prevention Roundtable (NPPR) will be hosting two webinars this summer to highlight current activities and future plans for the organization. The FREE webinars are open to anyone interested in learning more about the organization and how all stakeholders can work together to better advance and share our pollution prevention (P2) knowledge, successes and opportunities.

Is there going to be National P2 Conference? Do they still have their workgroups? Are there plans for P2 Week? Is NPPR doing anything to help secure P2 funding in the federal budget?

Learn the answers to these questions and more!!

The first webinar will be held on Wednesday, July 18, 2018 from 2:30 pm to 3:30 pm EDT and is now open for registration. The second webinar will be scheduled sometime in August 2018.

As the only membership organization in the United States devoted solely to Pollution Prevention (P2), NPPR acts as a window on the P2 community and offers a national forum for promoting the development, implementation, and evaluation of efforts to avoid, eliminate, or reduce pollution at the source.

NPPR’s members are comprised of the country’s preeminent P2 experts from state and local government programs, small business assistance networks, non-profit groups, industry associations, federal agencies and academia, along with representatives from industrial and commercial facilities and interested individuals. There’s a membership level for everyone!

Register now for the NPPR webinar on July 18, 2018 at 2:30 p.m. EDT!

Visit www.p2.org to learn more about NPPR.

 

Solar Alliance and Whayne Supply collaborate on three solar projects in Kentucky

Solar Alliance Energy announced it has completed the installation of three solar projects in Kentucky in cooperation with Whayne Supply, a Caterpillar Dealer serving Kentucky, West Virginia South Eastern Ohio and Southern Indiana. Solar Alliance is proud to be recognized as the partner with Whayne Supply, a company that has been in the energy business in Kentucky for decades and provides a full line of diversified energy solutions.

“Whayne Supply has a long history of providing complete solutions and support to customers in the construction, transportation and power generation industries,” said Whayne Supply power systems manager, Brad Zingre. “Supply of solar equipment from Caterpillar Inc. is an integral component of renewable, environmentally conscious, power generation systems enabling customers to maximize efficiency”.

Solar Alliance and Whayne Supply worked together on the 34.5-kW solar array in Louisville, which is installed on the roof of the Archdiocese of Louisville’s pastoral center and was made possible through the Louisville Gas and Electric Company (LG&E) and Kentucky Utilities Company (KU) Business Solar program.

“We want to be good citizens. We want to be able to address environmental challenges that all of us are aware of, in a way that we are not simply part of the problem, but actually become part of the solution,” said Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz. “We know that we can be an example and a witness to other people. So any way that if they, businesses, can say if the archdioceses can do it, maybe we can do it,” concluded Kurtz.

Solar Alliance and Whayne Supply also worked together on a 35.25-kW solar array installed on the roof of the Hillside Theater in Hazard, Kentucky, which included a US Department of Agriculture (USDA) grant, and a residential solar system also in Hazard. All three of the projects utilized Caterpillar modules and panels. Additionally, Whayne Supply and Solar Alliance are partnered on a 32-kW solar array in West Virginia.

Read the full article by Kelsey Misbrener on the Solar Power World website.

 

MIT experts pioneer a way to recover drinking water from power plants

It uses electrical forces that combat aerodynamic drag.

Water accounts for around 70 percent of the Earth’s surface, but it’s still not reaching those who need it most: three billion people live in water-stressed areas or lack access to drinking water. Things are starting to look up, however. Recent efforts from CSIRO, Belgian university researchers, and now, a system envisioned by MIT engineers are all pioneering new ways to generate clean H2O.

The MIT solution essentially maximizes the amount of fresh water that can be recovered from power plants. By introducing electrical forces into fog-rich air, the typical aerodynamic problems that prevent water collection are circumvented, and gathering more clean water is possible.

The system was developed in response to a problem that targets water deficient coastal areas: approximately 40 percent of all fresh water gathered from US lakes and rivers is reserved for cooling down power plants, but the fog-harvesting systems in place — metal or plastic mesh hung vertically — were only managing to trap a very small percentage of the targeted water droplets. Because of an aerodynamics issue, tonnes of potentially drinkable water was turning into vapor.

Associate professor Kripa Varanasi saw a way to minimize that wastage. If fog-rich air was zapped with ions (charged atoms or molecules), then ensuing water droplets would become electrically charged — which would in turn allow them to directly gravitate towards a mesh of wires and drain into a collector. The benefits of the new system are multifold — not only does it allow a more efficient way of gathering drinkable water, it uses low-cost materials that would help power plants reduce operating costs.

The team also invested in capturing water from the plumes of power plant cooling towers. They’re a much more concentrated source of water vapor compared with fogbanks, and therefore, allow the MIT system to work even more efficiently. Varanasi says that annually, the average 600-megawatt power plant could capture up to 150 million gallons of water which would otherwise be wasted.

Read the original article on the Engadget website.

 

Looking for ways for your manufacturing to become more sustainable?

Start with ASTM standards!

Manufacturers are constantly looking for ways to use their resources more efficiently, which, in turn, can minimize their environmental impacts. In recent years, many manufacturers and others, including the three of us, came to the table through a standards development organization called ASTM International to create a series of guidance documents that could support sustainable manufacturing overall.

One of the most important results of this is the “Standard Guide on Definition, Selection, and Organization of Key Performance Indicators for Environmental Aspects of Manufacturing Processes” (E3096-17), which provides guidance for how to pull the collective wisdom of an organization and decide on the right things to start measuring and improving on.

ASTM International’s Sustainability Committee (E60) develops sustainability and sustainable development standards to help industries address environmental, social, economic and other issues relating to sustainability. Subcommittee E60.13 focuses specifically on sustainable manufacturing. Sustainable manufacturing is an ongoing topic of discussion across a wide range of manufacturing enterprises. Consisting of processes that minimize negative environmental impacts while conserving energy and other natural resources, sustainable manufacturing also incorporates economically sound processes that are safe for employees, communities and consumers. According to Amy Costello, sustainability manager, Armstrong Flooring and chair of the subcommittee, standards are vital as manufacturers embark on the journey of benchmarking and developing sustainability metrics. Costello notes that the subcommittee develops standards that manufacturers can use to benchmark, assess, implement and communicate sustainability metrics, including standards for evaluating, improving and measuring gate-to-gate processes in the production of finished goods.

Shaw C. Feng, mechanical engineer at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, led the development of E3096-17, which provides guidance to help manufacturers set reasonable, realistic operational objectives for reducing the environmental impact of their manufacturing processes. The quantifiable measures of environmental impact reductions are called Key Performance Indicators (KPIs). A KPI is used to measure how well an objective for self-improvement is being met. Rather than dictating goals, this standard helps people to set their own goals. You know your business better than anyone!

Using the new standard, manufacturers can develop KPIs to assess the sustainability performance of their manufacturing processes.

Manufacturing industry practitioners will find the standard most useful. The standard calls for a team of people from multiple viewpoints, such as process engineers, production line managers, site managers, factory management teams and business stakeholders, to collaborate in selecting KPIs. It applies established techniques from decision-making theory to systematically focus on the most effective KPIs for that organization. Manufacturers will use the standard to help themselves set measurement priorities for tracking and reducing environmental impacts, such as the intake of energy, raw materials and water, energy/material inefficiencies, (toxic) wastes (in both solid and liquid forms) emitted from manufacturing processes, greenhouse gas emissions and other harmful substances generated from the manufacturing processes. Regulatory bodies and laboratories may use E3096 to specify industry KPIs through a multi-stakeholder consensus process and based on standard terminology and procedures.

Read the full article on the National Association of Manufacturers website.

 

See What’s New at ESRC

The Environmental Sustainability Resource Center (ESRC) is a member of the Pollution Prevention ESRC-Logo120x120Resource Exchange (P2Rx™), a national network of regional information centers. The objective of the ESRC is to provide technical environmental sustainability information and training to industrial service providers in EPA Regions 3 & 4. Region 3 includes Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, D.C., Delaware and Maryland. Region 4 includes Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee. ESRC resources and staff are available to users in industry, consulting and universities. Please visit the ESRC website or call toll free (855) 531-3772 for more information. The ESRC is administered by the Kentucky Pollution Prevention Center (KPPC).

Enhancing Business Operations through Sustainability – ESRC Webinar Training Series

The Environmental Sustainability Resource Center (ESRC) delivered a training series of webinars intended to enhance business operations through applied sustainability strategies.

This four-part recorded webinar series provides insight on making the business case for environmental sustainability, identifying the building blocks of a systematic approach for success and provides examples and resources to help turn actions into outcomes.

Benefits of viewing the recorded webinars

– Identify low-cost/no-cost opportunities to stimulate business success through sustainability.
– Enhance environmental performance.
– Build an organizational culture that embraces and succeeds through sustainability.
– Observe real-world examples of implementation.
– Obtain tools and resources to assist sustainability efforts.
– Learn about technical assistance available.

Recordings for all four of webinars are now available with closed captioning and related information

Find out more about the training series and view the recorded webinars.

 

GreenBiz – Sustainability news and resources

GreenBiz advances the opportunities at the intersection of business, technology and sustainability. Through its websites, events, peer-to-peer network and research, GreenBiz promotes the potential to drive transformation and accelerate progress — within companies, industries and in the very nature of business. Since 1991, GreenBiz has chronicled and been a catalyst for thought leadership in aligning environmental responsibility with profitable business practices.

Currently on the GreenBiz website by Erica Hauver:

Message from Mars: How to institutionalize sustainability

Mars has generated numerous headlines by committing $1 billion to achieve the company’s Sustainable in a Generation Plan.

A billion dollars is a lot of money, even for Mars. But leaving aside the substantial funding, the announcement could be seen as yet another plan marking the beginning of a company’s sustainability journey. Looks can be deceiving. The Mars commitment and plan are exceptional — not just for the goals set for the future, but for what Mars already has achieved.

The company has spent the past decade methodically institutionalizing a sustainable business mindset and practices across this large organization ($35 billion annual revenue; 80,000 employees; 80 countries). Mars is a family-owned business that largely has shunned publicity for 100 years. Ensuring it was walking the talk before it made external announcements is the Mars way. And walking the talk at Mars means meeting a wholly different standard from most other companies.

Institutionalizing anything in a large, complex organization is one of the most difficult tasks any company can undertake. How has Mars done it?

Defining its own path

The topic of sustainability hit the agenda of Mars’ global management team meetings in 2007. At that point, the company had no sustainability plan and little understanding of what all the noise was about. A Mars regional president was asked to form an executive-level team to assess the risks and relevance of sustainability to its business and report back. (Full disclosure: I served as an adviser to this group during its first few years).

From the outset, Mars was willing to cut its own path. Corporate social responsibility and sustainability reporting were driving the approach that many peers adopted. But Mars leaders knew that externally imposed approaches would not get traction within the business.

Instead, Mars started with its products — and that has made all the difference.

An unvarnished, data-driven sustainability story was developed for the top brands in each of its business segments — chocolate, pet care, food, drinks and Wrigley. These sustainability stories quantified the social and environmental impacts of each product, as well the related commercial risks.

Powerful insights emerged for each brand and division, and for the company as a whole, about its most valuable assets. Answers to “What is the relevance of sustainability to our business?” and “What is the relevance of our business to sustainability?” became clear and compelling when depicted and quantified through the lens of the company’s iconic brands.

From the moment those sustainability stories were circulated, sustainability became accepted as an integral part of Mars’ operations and corporate strategy.

Read the full article on the GreenBiz website and learn about how Mar’s Five Principles underpin a strong corporate culture.

Find the latest articles, videos and resources on the GreenBiz website.

Scroll to Top


Upcoming Training, Events and Conferences

  • EPA Energy Star Portfolio Manager Training Series @ Spalding University
    Essential to the procurement of an Energy Star certification is the ability to effectively utilize the EPA’s Portfolio Manager utility. In this three part series, participants will learn everything from the basics of entering building and energy data into the software, to the more advanced functions of setting goals and targets for their energy improvements. Technical experts will be on-site to assist with questions after each of the webinars are completed.
    June 29 – Portfolio Manager 201
    July 20 – Portfolio Manager 301
    Find out more and register for these ENERGY STAR workshops.
  • NPPR Briefing Webinar
    The 2018 Sustainability Summit will provide a unique opportunity for sustainability practitioners at leading companies to enjoy a safe space to address the most urgent and persistent strategic, operational, and implementation challenges they face in addressing the environmental, social, and governance (ESG) performance of their companies. The Summit will enable peer-to-peer exchange and engagement with leading practitioners and subject matter experts to work in a collaborative way through the major challenges that corporate sustainability professionals face.
    July 18 at 2:30 p.m. EDT
    Register now for the NPPR webinar
  • 17th Annual Sustainability Summit
    The 2018 Sustainability Summit will provide a unique opportunity for sustainability practitioners at leading companies to enjoy a safe space to address the most urgent and persistent strategic, operational, and implementation challenges they face in addressing the environmental, social, and governance (ESG) performance of their companies. The Summit will enable peer-to-peer exchange and engagement with leading practitioners and subject matter experts to work in a collaborative way through the major challenges that corporate sustainability professionals face.
    July 17-18 – New York, NY
    Register for this sustainability summit.
  • Building Operator Certification (BOC) level I training
    Building Operator Certification (BOC) is a nationally recognized, competency-based program focusing on energy-efficient building operations and preventive maintenance procedures. The program will train facility personnel to understand how their building systems work together, and how to bring them to their most efficient level of operation.
    August 16 – Lexington, KY
    Register for this valuable training.

 

EPA ENERGY STAR webinars:

  • Beat the Peak – Using Water Wisely for Commercial Outdoor Spaces
    Outdoor water use peaks during the summer, raising water bills and straining water supplies. Learn how to design and maintain attractive, healthy landscapes while minimizing irrigation and water losses during the dry summer months and throughout the year. Lower overall operating costs and prepare for outdoor water use restrictions with strategies to manage irrigation systems effectively to prevent inefficiencies and leaks. Finally, learn how to manage pools to reduce water loss from evaporation, filter cleaning, mineral buildup, leaks, and splashing.
    July 11 at 1 p.m. EDT
  • Award Winning Energy Service Companies – 2018 ENERGY STAR Partners of the Year for Service & Product Providers
    What does it take to be recognized by the US EPA as a leading company in delivering superior energy services? Join this webinar and hear two outstanding 2018 ENERGY STAR Partner of the Year winners tell their story of how they achieved the award.
    July 11 at 2:30 p.m. EDT


Portfolio Manager Series

  • 101 – July 5 at 1 p.m. EDT – Attendees will learn how to: navigate the Portfolio Manager; add a property and enter details about it; enter energy and water consumption data; share properties; generate performance reports to assess progress; and respond to data requests.
  • 201 – July 12 at 1 p.m. EDT – Learn more advanced functionalities such as: managing and tracking changes to your property uses over time; using spreadsheet templates to update property data; setting goals and targets to plan energy improvements for properties; generating and using custom reports; and using the Sustainable Buildings Checklist.
  • 301 – July 19 at 1 p.m. EDT – Learn about some advanced features, including: using spreadsheet upload templates to update property data; setting goals and targets to plan energy improvements for properties; creating custom reports; and using the Sustainable Buildings Checklist.

 

View these plus more ENERGY STAR training opportunities and to register.

View recorded ENERGY STAR webinars at any time.

 

Ca.jpg-icon-SSPTo view these and other sustainability-related events, please visit the KPPC Events Calendar.

 

Scroll to Top


 

View past issues of SSP