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DCA and KPPC partner to deliver a free workshop on steam efficiency in September

Energy savings through steam efficiency.

Due to its high heat content and transportability, steam production is a major force in manufacturing and industrial processes. It could be said that steam is a wonderful thing. Efficient generation and use of steam can provide a significant cost savings opportunity and minimizes its impact on a facility’s environmental footprint.

Registration page for the workshop.To assist steam users in Kentucky, the Division of Compliance Assistance (DCA) and the Kentucky Pollution Prevention Center (KPPC) have partnered to provide The Wonders of Steam workshop to be held on September 28, 2017 from 8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the Dow Chemical Company faciilty in Louisville, Kentucky. The theme of the workshop is energy savings through steam efficiency and is free to attend.

“Steam is often taken for granted. But leaks and malfunctioning traps can add up to real dollars and cause operational problems,” said Cheryle Eakle, Senior Sustainability Engineer at KPPC.

Steam experts speaking at this workshop will show how maintaining a steam system can save money. Topics to be covered will address the properties of steam, achieving steam efficiency, selection and operation of steam traps, insulating to reduce energy loss and an overview of boiler efficiency and regulations. A workshop agenda is available on the DCA website.

The target audience for this workshop includes facility managers and owners, environmental health and safety professionals, and representatives of manufacturing and industrial facilities.

Reducing steam energy waste lowers operating costs which leads to improved business performance and more sustainable operations.

If your facility uses steam energy, make plans to attend this free workshop by registering online at https://dca.ticketleap.com/wonders-of-steam/dates/Sep-28-2017_at_0800AM

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Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet awards grants of more than $1.6m to innovative energy projects

EEC LogoEnergy and Environment Cabinet Secretary Charles Snavely has announced that seven organizations will share more than $1.6 million in grant funding to promote efficient technologies and practices in public and private-sector buildings.

Recipients include education, utility service, local government, and waste water treatment organizations.

“These projects represent innovative initiatives that provide long-term benefits to the citizens of Kentucky,” said Sec. Snavely. “Some projects build upon existing programs that have already demonstrated the value of investments in energy efficiency while other projects integrate new technologies and practices in areas that support infrastructure in local communities.”

Grant funds are provided under a 2011 settlement agreement for a Clean Air Act violation. The settlement required the permittee to invest in new and upgraded state-of-the-art pollution controls that will reduce pollution, save energy and protect public health and the environment. Kentucky received $11.2 million to implement environmental mitigation projects.

Kentucky’s Energy and Environment Cabinet issued a request for proposals early this year to award unused funds from the 2011 settlement.

The University of Louisville, Kentucky Pollution Prevention Center, received $105,426 to implement a building operator certification program. The program will train and certify facility managers on building operations to achieve energy savings.

Read the full article to see all of the awards on the Northern Kentucky Tribune website.

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Economic development forums bring together Kentucky agricultural and manufacturing interests

Meetings aim to expand ag’s role in economic development

Frankfort, KY (June 29, 2017)–Three economic development forums held across Kentucky this week aimed to expand the stream of agricultural products into Kentucky’s manufacturing sector, state Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles said.

The Linking Agriculture for Networking & Development (LAND) forums were held Tuesday in Owingsville, Wednesday in Shelbyville, and Thursday in Princeton. The Kentucky Department of Agriculture (KDA) and the Kentucky Association of Manufacturers (KAM) facilitated the forums with the financial support of the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund and other regional sponsors.

“These forums brought together various agricultural and manufacturing interests to talk about how they can work together,” Commissioner Quarles said. “We will continue this discussion going forward as we seek to expand agriculture’s role as an economic development tool that will generate income and jobs in all parts of Kentucky.”

“We are proud to be a part of this initiative,” said Greg Higdon, President and CEO, Kentucky Association of Manufacturers. “Using raw agricultural products to develop value-added products downstream can produce new economic opportunities to help support and grow both individuals and communities in Kentucky’s rural areas.”

Each forum featured presentations from Commissioner Quarles, regional agricultural leaders, and industry management to discuss successful collaborations and reference resources to foster additional development. Each program included a Kentucky Proud lunch with locally sourced farm ingredients.

About the Kentucky Department of Agriculture:
The Kentucky Department of Agriculture (KDA) is a consumer protection and service agency that affects every Kentuckian every day. The KDA administers Kentucky Proud, the official state farm marketing program, and other programs to help Kentucky farmers find new markets for their products. The KDA also performs numerous regulatory duties – inspecting motor fuel pumps, amusement rides, and eggs; testing motor fuel and price scanners; regulating the pesticide industry in Kentucky; calibrating scales used in commerce, and many others – to help maintain our quality of life.

About KAM:
Established in 1911, the Kentucky Association of Manufacturers is Kentucky’s most effective advocate for manufacturers. KAM’s mission is to protect and create a manufacturing-friendly environment in Kentucky. In addition to advocating, KAM connects, educates and provides cost-saving programs and products to members. For more information, go to: www.KAM.us.com

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Western Kentucky University campus transforms

Western Kentucky University’s campus in Bowling Green has changed a lot over the past 10 years. The addition of more than 20 campus dining locations, a 14,0000-square-foot addition to the student fitness center and several other projects are some easily visible improvements.

But over those same 10 years perhaps the biggest improvement is something people see daily: WKU’s energy policy and infrastructure.

In 2015, the campus earned recognition as one of the U.S. Department of Education’s Green Ribbon schools for its sustainability efforts.

“We have been able to really reduce our energy consumption, starting in about 2008, from using about 15 kilowatts per hour per square foot,” said Bryan Russell, a former WKU student and current employee. “We’re now down to about 11 kilowatts per square foot in a building. At the same time we’ve actually increased our gross square footage of the university by 774,000 gross square feet.”

Russell said that’s kept WKU’s utility budget from growing at a rapid pace.

Read more about WKU’s s sustainability efforts in the Bowling Green Daily News.

 

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Bon Secours KY receives national environmental award

The Bon Secours Kentucky Health System (BSKHS) of Ashland, Kentucky, has been honored with the 2017 Emerald Award from Practice Greenhealth, the nation’s leading organization dedicated to environmental sustainability in healthcare, according to the BSKHS website. The award is one of the Environmental Excellence Awards given each year to honor environmental achievements in the healthcare sector.

The Greenhealth Emerald Award recognizes healthcare facilities that are setting the standard in eliminating mercury, reducing and recycling waste, sustainable sourcing and other areas. Winning hospitals have demonstrated a strong commitment to sustainability and shown leadership in the local community and in the healthcare sector.

“We are proud to be recognized with this honor, because sustainability is at the core of our healing mission and central to protecting the health of our patients, staff and community,” said BSKHS CEO Kevin Halter. “I’d like to thank our Green Team, led by Diana Williams, in helping us achieve this award. This honor demonstrates that Our Lady of Bellefonte Hospital (OLBH) and the Bon Secours Kentucky Health System continue our work while looking to a future where healthcare is focused on sustainability.”

The Practice Greenhealth awards will be presented May 18 in Minneapolis, Minnesota, at the conclusion of the CleanMed Conference & Exhibition.

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Solar panels give new bourbon distillery green edge

Solar Panels photoSHELBYVILLE – Kentucky’s bourbon distilling business grew with the opening of The Bulleit Distilling Co., a $115-million facility near Shelbyville.

Owned by spirits maker Diageo, the distillery can produce up to 1.8 million proof gallons of bourbon a year. It employs 30 people full-time.

What makes the distillery, which sits on 300 acres between Shelbyville and Hatton, stand out among Kentucky’s large distilling plants is its use of solar energy.

The facility features a solar array used to power its forklifts. The array produces about 40 megawatt hours per year. The energy can go directly into the Shelby County power grid. The industrial solar panel is a first for the North American Diageo distilleries and a first for Shelby County.

“If there is excess power, it will be back on the grid. So far, there hasn’t been any excess.” said Candi Waford, manager of member services of Shelby Energy Cooperative.

Other environmentally friendly aspects of the distillery include 100 acres of land surrounding the distillery that still retains its natural landscape. The distillery also uses water from the nearby natural Guist Creek Lake, stored in a pond near the plant, and uses corn grown in Shelby County.

“Environmental conservation is a top priority at the Bulleit Distilling Co.,” said Pauline Rooney, vice president, distillation, maturation and engineering for Diageo North America in an email.

Though there are no current plans to expand the solar array, it can be increased if needed, officials said.

Since 2011, distilleries and breweries have been sharing ideas about environmental issues through the Sustainable Spirits Initiative, formed by the Kentucky Distillers Association and the Division of Compliance Assistance of the state department for Environmental Protection.

Other energy-saving measures include Maker’s Mark providing a natural habitat for wildlife near its distillery in Loretto and the Jim Beam facility in Boston, in Nelson County, using an electric demand system to cut their electric bill.

Eric Gregory, president of the Kentucky Distillers’ Association, said the Bulleit distillery innovations are the latest in a pattern of environmentally conscious decisions.

Read the full article by the Lexington Herald-Leader.

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Don’t miss the 2017 KAM Conference & Trade Show

SSP-jpeg-KAMlogoRegistration is open for the 2017 KAM Conference & Trade Show. The deadline to register is May 24. The Kentucky Association of Manufacturers (KAM) is facilitating the conference, which will be held May 31 and June 1 at the Lexington Center in Lexington, Kentucky. The theme for this year’s conference is “Manufacturing Our Future.” The goal for the conference is for manufacturers to understand and leverage where they are now to influence manufacturing’s future. Trade show and sponsorship registrations must be received by close of business on May 10 to ensure inclusion in all event materials.

The conference offers a full agenda of relevant information from renowned speakers, including Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt, who will speak about his new position in Washington, D.C., and his perspectives about energy and the environment. The conference will have 11 sessions over two days, and will include an industry trade show.

Additionally, the Kentucky Pollution Prevention Center (KPPC) will have a booth at the conference. KPPC helps Kentucky businesses and industries develop environmentally sustainable, cost-saving solutions for improved energy efficiency.

KAM invites manufacturers, suppliers, legislators, educators, policy makers, large energy consumers and key decision makers to join them at the conference for focused discussion on topics such as: The pipeline of qualified and skilled talent; reliable and affordable energy now and into the future; and cybersecurity, hacking and the Internet of Things (IoT).

KAM is focused on giving manufacturers practical, relevant information that can immediately be put into practice to see positive results right away. It is also committed to ensuring Kentucky has a manufacturing-friendly environment now and into the future.

Learn more about the 2017 KAM Conference & Trade Show and register to attend.

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Governor’s Conference on Energy & the Environment set for Oct. 19-20

SSP-jpeg-Gov-Conf-logoThe Energy and Environment Cabinet will hold its 41st yearly conference examining contemporary issues regarding energy and our environment. The conference will be held at the Lexington Convention Center in Lexington, Kentucky.

Last year’s conference was full of sessions covering corporate sustainability initiatives, renewable energy, energy efficiency, today’s utility landscape and environmental policies.

For more information please check the 2017 conference website periodically.

Links to last year’s presentations are featured on the conference website.

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Recycled Tire Asphalt Grant Funding available to counties

EEC LogoEnergy and Environment Cabinet Secretary Charles G. Snavely announced that grant funding will be made available to counties for projects that use recycled Kentucky waste tires in rubber-modified asphalt paving projects. This grant can be used to fund either chip seal or thin asphalt overlay pavement projects.

Counties may apply either for funding for up to 24,000 square yards of chip seal paving or up to 12,000 square yards of asphalt overlay paving. Counties may not apply for both options.

Successful applicants will be required to complete an equivalent project on a similar section of road using standard asphalt, at their own expense, in order to compare the performance of standard versus rubber-modified asphalt.

Rubber-modified asphalt involves amending standard asphalt with crumb rubber derived from recycled waste tires. Chip seal is a pavement surface treatment that combines one or more layers of liquid asphalt with one or more layers of fine aggregate, while an asphalt overlay consists of a thin layer of asphalt pavement applied over an existing asphalt surface. The thickness of an overlay for the purposes of this project should not exceed 1.5 inches.

Depending on the application, rubber-modified asphalt has numerous potential benefits including increased skid resistance, increased road life and noise reduction, in addition to providing a valuable end use for recycled waste tires. The objective of the grant is to determine if rubber-modified asphalt can provide superior performance to standard asphalt in certain applications.

Funding for this grant comes from the Kentucky Waste Tire Trust Fund, which receives $1 from every new tire sold in the Commonwealth. In addition to providing funding to promote the development of markets for recycled waste tires, the fund also supports waste tire collection events, tire pile clean-ups, and grants for counties to manage waste tires.

Grant applications must be submitted no later than June 5, and projects must be completed by Dec. 31. Grant applications packets will be sent by email to county judge-executives and solid waste coordinators.

Learn more about the cabinet’s waste tire programs.

View the full article for more information in the “Naturally Connected” blog by the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet.

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Conservation, productivity go together

EEC LogoRICHMOND, KY — No one knows the importance of conservation better than those who directly depend on the soil for their livelihood.

Even as agriculture becomes increasingly competitive, farmers must focus on conservation as well as production.

Fortunately, those twin goals can be mutually supportive, Ballew Farms on Boonesboro Road is proof of that.

On March 21, Lonzo and Taffy Ballew of Ballew Farms were honored by the Madison County Conservation District as Outstanding Conservators of the Year.

Lonzo and his brother Leroy are the third generation of the Ballew family to work the farm now near Interstate 75 Exit 95.

While farming is a family tradition, the Ballews are innovators, according to Brandon Sears, Madison County Cooperative Extension Agent for Agriculture.

They are always looking to increase crop diversity, try new marketing methods and apply the most up-to-date production techniques, Sears said.

The Ballews also are conscientious about learning and employing best practices for conservation as recommended by the Natural Resources Conservation Service, said Lisa Smith of the Madison County NRCS office.

Read the full article by the Richmond Register.

 

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